CJM Loco Weathering

Weathering :- An Insight into how CJM creates that authentic look!

Throughout the website you will see many models (all belonging to customers) with varying degrees of weathering. This page looks at just a few examples of CJM Loco Weathering in close up.

Lightly Weathered Models

CJM Weathered HST / DVT 43080 in Swallow Intercity Livery.  Converted and detailed, light weathered un-powered model.

CJM Weathered HST / DVT 43080 in Swallow Intercity Livery.
Converted and detailed, light weathered un-powered model.

CJM Lightly weathered 37251 "Northern Lights" in Swallow Intercity livery.

CJM Lightly weathered 37251 “Northern Lights” in Swallow Intercity livery.

Very Dirty Models

CJM Class 37 - 37025 in large logo BR blue Model Notes- General muck and grime, exhaust blackening, faded / patchy / streaky body sides, faded roof with ground in grime on panel joins.

CJM Class 37 – 37025 in large logo BR blue Model Notes- General muck and grime, exhaust blackening, faded / patchy / streaky body sides, faded roof with ground in grime on panel joins.

CJM Class 60 - 60044 EWS livery Model Notes - Fairly clean model, with lots of heavy fading on sides and roof, name plate has been removed along with paint, lots of grime on cab ends.

CJM Class 60 – 60044 EWS livery Model Notes – Fairly clean model, with lots of heavy fading on sides and roof, name plate has been removed along with paint, lots of grime on cab ends.

All models are weathered from photos, if not of the actual loco, the same class and livery. All are air brushed using my trusty Badger 150, with areas and details pulled out using a sable brush and white spirit to create streaks, wash effects and grime in all the right places. The process usually takes place on a fully finished pristine model, that said on some the process will start right from the first colours being applied. Indeed all models have some scale colour pre shading using darker and lighter tones of the same colour to lift detail and create depth. This is not a quick process using a tin of paint labeled weathering! It will take place typically over 2 or 3 days and can take many hours. Always remembering the key to success is that a little is more! Colours :- pretty much any except white and a minute amount of black around exhaust. Expect to see silver grey, orange, brown, dark red, medium grey, and dark grey. Additionally small amounts of actual loco colours tinted darker or lighter for emphasis. The final (3rd ) varnish coat will be matt with small amounts of very thin gloss to give certain areas an oily/ greasy look.

CJM Class 47 - 47636 "Sir John de Graeme" in Large Logo BR Blue Livery Model Notes - General muck and grime, exhaust blackening, faded / patchy / streaky body sides, faded roof with ground in grime on panel joins.

CJM Class 47 – 47636 “Sir John de Graeme” in Large Logo BR Blue Livery Model Notes – General muck and grime, exhaust blackening, faded / patchy / streaky body sides, faded roof with ground in grime on panel joins.

CJM Class 66 - 66504 in Freightliner livery Model Notes - Vast quantities of muck and grime, somebody has taken pity and washed the cabs a bit, just need to do the rest of the loco now!

CJM Class 66 – 66504 in Freightliner livery Model Notes – Vast quantities of muck and grime, somebody has taken pity and washed the cabs a bit, just need to do the rest of the loco now!

CJM Class 56 - 56050 "British Steel Teesside" Model Notes - Plenty of grime all over the model, notice how the weathering lifts out the detail and adds depth of field to the model.

CJM Class 56 – 56050 “British Steel Teesside” Model Notes – Plenty of grime all over the model, notice how the weathering lifts out the detail and adds depth of field to the model.

Under Frames

  u-f-66707-gbrf_750px u-f-59206-nat-power_750px u-f-56049-trans_750px

Under frames are a usual grime trap ranging from general dirt to fluid spills. If weathering is performed correctly and enough attention to detail observed photos of the models can actually be mistaken for the real thing. The top image shows this very well and is actually of a CJM class 56; the exceptional detail combined with the pain staking weathering makes it appear like the real thing.

Bogies

bog-59206-nat-power2_750pxbog-59104-arc_750px bog-59206-nat-power_750px

Along with under frames, bogies are another grime trap. The general finish of the painted surface tends to fade and with grease and grime becoming ground in. Although an effort is made by the train companies to remove the dirt every so often they don’t put the same effort in as if you were washing your car and there tends to be a build up around the raised and depressed details usually with a bit of rust as well. From a modeling point of view this is good with the grime and rust patches adding depth and showing off the details, especially with a few highlights thrown in, although it does help when the detail is there in the first place!

Buffer Beams

buff-59206-nat-power_750px cab-comparison_750px

Buffer beams  are another great weathering point; grease splats on the buffers take more than just a blob of black paint, especially if they have not been greased in a while, like the image above. There are plenty of places where dirt builds up and like wise plenty of rust spots! Its worth noting in the image of the two class 60’s above how a loco is transformed by weathering, bringing out all the detail and giving the loco more depth and feel.

Main Body

 body-56040  body-56049-trans
 body-60098-2
body-loadhaul
body-56049

The main body of the loco has plenty of opportunity for weathering using many different techniques to replicate the real thing, such as fading, streaking, grime, rust, exhaust fumes, even damage. The loco body is where the real artistry lies, unlike under frames and bogies the detail is not normally so pronounced and effects often need to be created on flat surfaces in many instances. Experience plays a major role here with some trial and error along the way.

Streaks

streak-47303 streak-56049-trans
body-60044

Streaks are a common weathering technique found on the side of loco bodies as the grime from the roof / exhaust / vents washes down the side of the loco. Not easy to replicate accurately it involves plenty of time and patience, with air brush, paint brush, multiple shades of same colour with some thinners. Rest assured both images are of CJM models. amazing what can be achieved in N gauge!

Fading

fade-73001 body-47791
streak-47639

Fading is a form of weathering that doesn’t involve dirt; it is caused by the effects of the sun, washing, heat and other environmental factors. This effect becomes more pronounced when things like name plates have been removed as in the second image. The 73 in B R Blue above shows the patchy and uneven body colour sometimes created by fading. Its not a case of simply spraying a dusting of white over the model. Fading is created using multiples of slight colour variations of the main base colour.

Exhausts

  ex-59104-arc ex-59-yeo ex-59206-nat-power

Exhaust gasses over time make a real mess on the top of a locomotive, dropping carbon and oil deposit as it leaves the exhaust. Each class of loco has its own distinct way that this occurs, 73’s for example, tend to have a small round build up of muck around the exhaust port, where as in comparison the 59’s shown above have a large area of build up spreading predominantly down one side of the loco. Exhaust weathering also uses multiple shades of the same colour to give the life like effect.